The Making of Her: Review

An insightful interview with the very talented Susie Nott-Bower.

the contemporary small press

I’ve been reading Susie Nott-Bower’s first novel, The Making of Her, and I’m impressed. Too often one looks at the small and independent press as a second choice for publication, but The Making of Her shows that there’s nothing second rate about working with independent publishers. The book examines being a woman in the twenty first century where looks are valued over experience. It asks questions about how we regard ourselves, how we see our flesh and skin as it changes over the years. Nott-Bower uses her experience in the world of television, the medium that puts a magnifying glass to our lives, and writes the story of Clara, a TV producer who has just reached 50 and denies her birthdays. She can’t combat other peoples’ perceptions as she wrangles with her young assistant Alix who is after her job. Clara’s best friend Josephine is married to a successful…

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The Making of a Writer

A fabulous book from a fabulous writer. If you haven’ read The Making of Her, all I can is, do.

the contemporary small press

On February 20th we’ll be at the British Library for our reading, writing and publishing event: Reading and Being Read.  To get you in the mood, we’ll be presenting a series of features throughout the month focusing on the great work of some of the writers and small presses who’ll be joining us on the day.

Here, Susie Nott-Bower, writer of The Making of Her, talks to us about the magic of writing…

Susie, you said that writing is magic, and ‘Like all creative acts, it has the potential to transform both the writer and the reader’ – can you elaborate on this a little bit?  In what ways do you see the potential for the writer and reader to be brought into a magical/transformative relationship through the text?

If creativity is the act of bringing the new into being, then fear is the ogre barring the way. …

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Passionate Publishing from Linen Press

Small presses are wonderful, and small presses like Linen Press are even more so.

the contemporary small press

On February 20th we’ll be at the British Library for our reading, writing and publishing event: Reading and Being Read.  To get you in the mood, we’ll be presenting a series of features throughout the month focusing on the great work of some of the writers and small presses who’ll be joining us on the day.

Here, Lynn Michell, founder of Linen Press, talks to us about her passion for publishing great women’s writing…

Lynn, the first book you published was Childhood’s Hilla turn of the century memoir by 93-year-old Marjorie Wilson – what did you spot in it that other publishers had missed?

I saw in Marjorie’s prose a rare lyricism and was astonished by her sensibility. Marjorie paints in poignant, vivid vignettes a portrait of Edinburgh at the turn of the century, giving back to us a time and place long gone. There is…

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